Specialty:
Integrative medicine: adult primary care and preventive medicine, approached holistically.

Practice Philosophy:
First do no harm, then, do good!

Areas of Focus:
Adult wellness, general preventive medicine and holistic primary care; comprehensive detoxification for chronic diseases, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, exposure to mold, heavy metals, solvents, pesticides and other toxins; occupational, environmental and recreational toxic exposures; chronic infections, including Lyme Disease and co-infections; women’s preventive and sexual health, especially in perimenopause and menopause.
 


Formal training/education:

Board Certified in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology and Transfusion Medicine by the American Board of Pathology

Board Certified in General Preventive Medicine and Public Health by the American Board of Preventive Medicine

 

Master of Science, Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland
Doctor of Medicine, Howard University College of Medicine
Bachelor of Arts, Natural Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

Postgraduate training in:
Preventive Medicine and Public Health (residency) University of Maryland Medical Center
Transfusion Medicine (fellowship) Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Anatomic and clinical pathology (residency) Temple University Hospital
Obstetrics and gynecology (internship) Thomas Jefferson University Hospital

About:
Dr. Cannon comes to NIHA after a 20 year career in academic medicine, and medical education and administration. Board-certified in anatomic and clinical pathology, and blood banking/ transfusion medicine, Dr. Cannon worked in student affairs and admissions at the medical school level, guiding, mentoring, and learning from students, from college through entrance to residency training and beyond.

A long-standing interest in disease prevention, environmental medicine and the integrative approach to diagnosis, testing and treatment led her to the preventive medicine program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she learned the population approach to prevention among other topics. Fortunately, the curriculum also included integrative, as well as environmental and occupational medicine; the information dovetailed beautifully with her interests and helped fill in the gaps that remain when addressing populations rather than individuals.

Approach to the Patient:
First do no harm, then, do good! Primum non nocere et tunc benefacere, if you prefer Latin.

We can all benefit from work on our health foundation - the “fundamental lifestyle factors” of functional medicine, which include nutrition, exercise, sleep/ rest, stress management and healthy relationships. Prevention is always a goal, no matter how challenging our health may be.

You are not your “problem list”, and your diagnoses are labels that usually point to underlying nutritional, assimilation (digestion and metabolism), structural, environmental, genetic, behavioral, physical, hormonal, energetic and/or spiritual issues that will respond, when correctly identified and treated. Finding the root cause(s) of your health issue is a tenet of integrative medicine.

My special interests include the damaging effects of environmental exposures and toxins and their roles in autoimmune, inflammatory, infectious, cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. I follow with great interest, any developments regarding the health effects of pesticides, heavy metals, nanoscale materials (as found in personal care products and cosmetics, for example) and genetically engineered foods. Finally, the explosion of the ‘omics (microbiomics, genomics and epigenomics, etc.) and their roles in precision medicine will hopefully be areas of focus that I can bring to bear on the health of patients through the internal environment, or “milieu”.


 


Dr. Cannon

Dr. Cannon really listened, and did not make me feel rushed even though I was late and she had another patient waiting. She takes my health concerns seriously. 4/17